a snail カッタ君

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I found a snail on a dish liquid bottle in the kitchen this morning. I named him 'Katta kun', and I moved him to one of the leaves in the vase at the kitchen corner.
I dripped some water on the leaves. Then Katta kun was busy to move around the leaves to drink some water. I had to leave home for a while and I was worried that he might fall down from the leaf to the sink.

When I came home and saw him, he was taking a nap. And is also still now. He is cute.
I wondered where he came from. I thought he was in the Japanese mustard spinach (Komatsuna) we had last night. I'm not sure. The reason why I thought was that when I lived in Tomakomai, Hokkaido more than five years ago, I found a snail in the Japanese mustard spinach. I had kept it for several days, and then I released it at the back of the apartment building. However, when I went to see it next day, there was only an empty shell. I was sad then. And I asked myself which was better for it, keep or release.

And now I'm on the fence. Keep or release?
I'll keep and enjoy with him for a few days, and then I will say good bye and release him by the stream.





P.S.
You can see the corrections of this article on this comment site.




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No title

You are very kind to creatures -- both big and small!

Re: No title

Hi, Always visiting.

Thank you, but what did you mean as big?

English Corrections

Original Article:

I found a snail on a dish liquid bottle in the kitchen this morning. I named him 'Katta kun', and I moved him to one of the leaves in the vase at the kitchen corner.
I dripped some water on the leaves. Then Katta kun was busy to move around the leaves to drink some water. I had to leave home for a while and I was worried that he might fall down from the leaf to the sink.

When I came home and saw him, he was taking a nap. And is also still now. He is cute.
I wondered where he came from. I thought he was in the Japanese mustard spinach (Komatsuna) we had last night. I'm not sure. The reason why I thought was that when I lived in Tomakomai, Hokkaido more than five years ago, I found a snail in the Japanese mustard spinach. I had kept it for several days, and then I released it at the back of the apartment building. However, when I went to see it next day, there was only an empty shell. I was sad then. And I asked myself which was better for it, keep or release.

And now I'm on the fence. Keep or release?
I'll keep and enjoy with him for a few days, and then I will say good bye and release him by the stream.

-----------------------------

Recommended Corrections:

This morning, I found a snail on a dish liquid bottle in the kitchen. I named him 'Katta kun', and I moved him to one of the leaves of a plant I have in a vase on the kitchen counter.
I dripped some water on the leaves. Upon sensing the water, Katta kun immediately made his way toward the water. I had to leave home for a while and I was worried that he might fall from the leaf and into the sink.

When I came home and saw him, he was taking a nap. He is, as of now, still sleeping. He is so cute.

I wondered where he had come from. Perhaps he was in the Japanese mustard spinach (Komatsuna) we had last night. Although I can't be sure, when I lived in Tomakomai, Hokkaido more than five years ago, I had found a snail in the Japanese mustard spinach I had brought back from the grocery store. I had kept it for several days, and I then released it behind our apartment building. However, when I went to see it the next day, there was only an empty shell. I was especially sad because I had asked myself whether or not keeping it would be better for it than setting it free.

As a result, I'm now on the fence. Should I keep Katta kun, or should I release him?

On second thought, I'll keep and enjoy him for a few days. I will then say good bye as I release him at a nearby stream.

Re: English Corrections

Hi, shiroi tora.

Thank you very much for the corrections.

I'm still confused past tense and past perfect tense.

From the oldest ....
1.(2~8) live in Tomakomai /P
2. find a snail /PP
3. keep it /PP
4. release it /P
5. go to see it /P
6. empty shell /P
7. sad /P
8. ask myself /PP

You used a mix of past tense and past perfect tense from 1 to 8.
I don't know why you used past tense for 1,4,5,6,7.
Please tell me.


English Corrections

Answers to Sakae's questions:

As a general rule:

1) Use past tense when you are specifying a particular point in time.

2) Use had when it was something which had occurred sometime prior to a specified or implied point in time.

3) Use have when it is from the past to the present.

To answer your questions:

1) Here is my reasoning: To have lived is a block of time. The time period is continuous and implied up to the specified end point. You use had when no specified point in time is given prior to a given point in time. Lived means that you are talking about the whole time up to the specified point already.

Ex...I ate an apple on the morning of our departure (specified time)/ I had eaten an apple prior to our departure (unspecified time)...vs...I lived there more than five years ago (although it seems unspecified...it is a continuous block of time...it includes all time within (specified through implication) / I had once lived there for ten years (unspecified time period from present) / I lived there for ten years over five years ago (specified time).

2) You had found something prior to your leaving Tomakomai. Unspecified point in time prior to the designated point in time. Of course, you had to have had the mustard spinach prior to your finding the snail...and so the resulting had there also.

3 & 4) I put 'had kept it for several days' because it is from an unspecified time period (when the snail was found). However, the point of release was not. When the unspecified time period had ended, that is when you released it. The point in time was specified...at the conclusion of the mentioned period of time.

5 & 6) It was a specified period of time...the next day.

7 & 8) You were especially sad at the time you had seen him. However, you had asked yourself the question at an unspecified time period prior to your having found him, *I assumed in the kitchen.

*Unless I had misunderstood your meaning. I had assumed you meant that you had asked yourself the question before releasing him...as you had found him dead. To have not found him dead would have possibly given rise to the question, as no predators would have been present in your kitchen. Unless you felt he would not have been happy in your kitchen. If such is the case, you must have thought that perhaps it was better that he had died free than to have been imprisoned in your kitchen.

Re: English Corrections

Hi, shiroi tora.

Thank you very much for the explanation.
I'd like to take enough time to understand it later.

No title

I was thinking of big flowers, hahaha. I should have said "you are very kind to tiny creatures" instead.

Re: No title

Hi, Always visiting.

Oh, big flowers!
I'm not so kind to any tiny creatures such as worms.
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Sakae

Author:Sakae
Welcome to my blog.
I'm married and we have a son. I live in Hokkaido, Japan.
I like handmade things and Ikebana(arranging flowers).
I hope that you enjoy my articles and photos.

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