Yakitori Bento

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One of the popular foods in Hakodate is Yakitori Bento from Hesegawa Store.
It's not chicken but pork. I like Yakitori with salt and pepper, but you can choose from satly sauce or soy-sauce-based sauce as well.
And the container, or bento box, is devised that there are four grooves on right side of the container so that you can pull out four skewers to remove from the food under the cover closed if you like.
One of the four skewers has vegetables such as eggplant, leek, and green pepper.
And as you can see, the seaweed covers the rice.

The other day, my English teacher said it was excellent and especially he liked quality of the pork.
And my son wanted to eat it yesterday by chance although I didn't say anything about the topic. I've wanted to eat it since I heard of it from my English teacher, too. So my family had them last night.
It was very good!






P.S.
You can see the corrections of this article on this comment site.




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The Yakitori Looks Delicious

Thank you for your comment in my blog.

The yakitori looks delicious!

I went to Hokkaido with a friend of mine years ago, and I stayed in Hakotade for only one day. I hope to visit the beautiful city some day again.

Re: The Yakitori Looks Delicious

Hi, Romi.

Thank you for visiting my blog, too.
There are many good places in Hakodate. I don't know how much longer I can live here, but I want to enjoy here as much as possible.

English Corrections

Original Article:

One of the popular foods in Hakodate is Yakitori Bento from Hesegawa Store.
It's not chicken but pork. I like Yakitori with salt and pepper, but you can choose from satly sauce or soy-sauce-based sauce as well.
And the container, or bento box, is devised that there are four grooves on right side of the container so that you can pull out four skewers to remove from the food under the cover closed if you like.
One of the four skewers has vegetables such as eggplant, leek, and green pepper.
And as you can see, the seaweed covers the rice.

The other day, my English teacher said it was excellent and especially he liked quality of the pork.
And my son wanted to eat it yesterday by chance although I didn't say anything about the topic. I've wanted to eat it since I heard of it from my English teacher, too. So my family had them last night.
It was very good!


----------------------------


Recommended Corrections:

One of the more popular foods in Hakodate is Yakitori Bento from *Hesegawa Store.

*If the name of the store includes the name 'Store'...then it is ok. However, if it is called 'Hesegawa' and it is a store...then it would just be ....from Hesegawa (and an explanation...such as: a local eatery...or a national food chain...etc.).

It consists not of chicken, but of pork. I like *Yakitori with salt and pepper, but you can choose from salty sauce or soy-sauce-based sauce as well.

*If they call their BBQ pork 'Yakitori Bento' it is ok (and not Yakibuta)...but since Yakitori already has its own meaning in your language...it would be confusing. It should be reclarified by saying '...their pork version of Yakitori Bento'...or any other way of signifying that you were not talking about the literal meaning. However, if you use their name for Yakibuta...you should put TM behind the word if they also use it (or whatever version you have of trade marking a word in Japan). I know you had already explained that it was pork...but if it is not clarified with a set of quotation marks '...' or TM each time you use their meaning...it automatically reverts to the literal meaning. This is where ambiguity arises if it is not done.


And the container, or bento box, was *devised with four grooves on the right side of the container so that you may remove the skewers from the food from under a closed cover, if you so desire.

*To devise...is to invent. It is done before the construction and production of the device. It is non-continual, and so, of the past tense.


One of the four skewers *consists of such vegetables as eggplant, leek, and green pepper. And as you can see, seaweed covers the rice.

*I am assuming that this skewer usually has nothing but vegetables on it.


The other day, my English teacher said it was excellent. He also said how he especially liked the quality of the pork.

Although I hadn't mentioned anything about Hesegawa's 'Yakitori Bento', just yesterday, *from out of the blue, my son mentioned how he wanted to eat some. As I've wanted to try some ever since my English teacher first mentioned them to me, I bought some for our family to try last night. They were very good!

*a term meaning a bolt (of lightning) from clear skies directly overhead (and so, out of the blue). This refers to an event which happens when there is no obvious cause or logical connection as to what had initiated it.


Re: English Corrections

Hi, shiroi tora.

Thank you very much for the corrections.
I had thought that 'from out of the blue' meant negative. I've just learned it can be used for a positive meaning as well.
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Sakae

Author:Sakae
Welcome to my blog.
I'm married and we have a son. I live in Hokkaido, Japan.
I like handmade things and Ikebana(arranging flowers).
I hope that you enjoy my articles and photos.

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